May 172017
 

This post took a while, but I wanted to wait until the fabric was done so it could be seen at the same time.

Everyone was warned to wear old clothes and showed up on a Sunday. It rained the two days before, so I was concerned, but without cause. Sunday was the brightest, sunniest day yet! In fact, it was so warm and sunny that the ice ended up melting much faster than I anticipated. That worked out. We gathered inside beforehand to discuss the process, dye blending, and to chose colors combinations.


This is one of my two sample dye combination boards. The two together show all the fiber reactive dyes I have, minus the black dyes (since they vary so much with handling) and some Jacquard brand little jars that I’m not going to buy again. Everyone looked over the colors, picked out their combinations and away we went.

I handed out the fabric to all, fresh from its chemical bath preparation (soda ash, urea, salt). Everyone got a large piece (42″ sq) and a quarter piece (22″ sq) and cotton embroidery thread, if desired.

Here is everyone arranging their ice onto the scrunched up fabrics. Slick helped out greatly by running out to get ice, then loading it into a wheelbarrow in the shade for us at exactly the right time. I know that sounds like a little thing, but when your whole process depends on ice on a sunny day, it becomes a big deal.


Everyone applied powder as desired. The little squares were placed on grids below the big ones, so as to catch the runoff dye. Dye dispersion results varied wildly for those pieces.

Once that was done, we all went inside and had some lunch. I put out a spread of finger foods and many gals brought foods, too. No cooking today! We had a whole table full of deliciousness and sat around talking for a few hours, which was quite nice. Afterwards, we went back out to see the progress.


A lot of the ice was melted. The gal on the back left there wanted extra blendy, muted colors, so she piled some more leftover ice onto hers. Now it is largely waiting. Everyone departed.

A few hours later, when it was getting darker in preparation for rain, I went out and checked on the pieces. The little bits were getting dry around the edges, so I put some of the chemical bath in a spray bottle and dampened them, then moved all the grids together for ease of covering.

All condensed and covered in plastic. I used rocks to keep the edges down, but I also went in with a staple gun when the wind began picking up to keep it all secure.

Then, the hard part, waiting two days. So impatient! At about 52 hours, I processed the fabrics: rinse in cool water, fixative in warm water, rinse, wash in Synthrapol and hot water, rinse for finish. With this many pieces to be washed at once, I was able to toss them in the machine and save myself some work! Nice. It was raining again, so I used the dryer. I did give all the pieces a quick trim with the scissors to remove threads that had washed loose. There weren’t many since I’d hemmed the fabrics before hand. I was tempted to iron them, to completely bring out their beauty, but I calmed the hell down instead.

I highly recommend clicking on the photos to see a bigger version. There are wonderful depths to all the pieces.

This gal had a plan. This piece could easily come live in my stash and join a future quilt. Rich and deep.


I love all these bold, intense, twisting colors. There is so much movement and drama.


Hers looked like rainbow candy sherbert. It looks so tasty on a sunny spring day!


This is an unusual color combination, but she had a theme.


This is the gal that added more ice.

I have to say that after having all these beautiful and vibrant dyed fabrics in my workshop, waiting for their delivery day, it was sad to see them delivered to their artist-creator-owners. They are so pretty I don’t know how they’ll have the heart to cut into them. If they were my pieces, I’d have to simply seam the edges and leave them as one of two pieces, tops.

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