Oct 202017
 

While I don’t have any cat photos for this Friday, I did complete a small, but useful workshop project. The spandrel (space under the stairs) in my workshop was used by prior owners as storage – for random crap, dirt, and a tangle of spider webs, as far as I can tell. Inspired by how much I loved using my last workshop spandrel for relaxation, I planned on doing something similar in this one.
My past workshop spandrel hammock.
The old hammock.
Me, in my workshop spandrel hammock, a dozen years ago.
Me, 12.5 years ago, reading in my old workshop spandrel hammock.

That spandrel had a lot of space to work with. The whole place had high ceilings, even in the basement, which meant a much larger spandrel area. There was so much space that I had a storage shelf above the hammock and at the foot area, too. My current spandrel is significantly smaller. I can stand up in the highest part, but only if I’m not wearing thick shoes. The hammock idea was out, but I bought a twin sized, foam mattress for it and figured that would be nice. Crawling into a soft, warm, corner of light and pillow filled space to read, sketch, or maybe have a nap. Sounds good, right? Except I kept not getting around to it (three years have passed since the mattress purchase) and finally, only this past month, realized it was because I didn’t want that so much. What I need more of is storage space, not a corner to chill in. The old spandrel hammock gave me a place to “be”, which was in short supply in the living spaces. Our house now has good amounts of living spaces, which is probably the biggest change to the motivation.

Thus, the foam mattress will get a frame (one day, in the years future) and live upstairs (probably) and the spandrel be mostly storage and workspace. Since it is so small, I need to maximize the unusual qualities of the space and the perfect need presented for this: a screen printing frame storage and drying area. After washing out screens it is good to have a spot for drying with free air flow all the way around them. Similarly, once you’ve coated a screen with photo sensitive emulsion, it needs at least an hour of free air drying in a light-free place. Even when they’re dry and safe for use, they need an undisturbed space to be stored in, preferably a space that is out of the way of curious cats and their destructive claws. I mathed up a design last Saturday morning and, using scrap lumber and a half a box of screws, spent the day building these racks. Racks? Brackets? I don’t know exactly what definition they’d fall under, but I’m calling them racks because it is close and the word is short.
Screen printing frame drying and storage racks.
(Do ignore the sloppy spray foam drippy bits that I’ve not trimmed down yet.)
Racks shown with some freshly recovered screens. This small, diagonal space is idea for a few reasons. One, air flow. The rack uprights and cross pieces leave lots of area for air movement around the frames. The photo doesn’t show, but I have a small fan in here to help. Two, I can reach through them to clean the dustbunnies or murder any wayward spiders that haven’t met me yet. Three, there are power wires running way back under there and I would not feel comfortable having them next to storage boxes or such, which means I’d have to protect and enclose them if I wanted to use this spot for traditional storage. Blerg. This works out great. This setup has slots for 22 frames, or 24 if I’m willing to allow the bottom ones to touch the floor. Oh yeah, fourth is that I won’t ever have to get down and crawl into that space to use it (only clean it, seldom) merely bend over slightly to reach the lower, racked frames.

And, for light protection:
Black felt light-blocking curtain.
A simple and cheap black felt curtain. There will be strings and top hooks to roll it up and keep it out of the way when needed, but I haven’t attached those yet. I will put two small hooks at the bottom also, to keep out mildly curious cats. I’ll add a motion activated air bottle for a few months of training to make sure any more-than-mildly-curious cats are discouraged.

Currently, I have ten screen printing frames which I mostly keep in a rotation of exposing, using, storing until I acknowledge I’ll never use them again, recovering them with remover, cleaning, and storing until I need a new screen print. The whole rotation takes years and I only have two or three (oh, I guess have twelve total then) that I intend to keep mostly-permanently. At the slow rate I acquire additional screens, this rack setup should last me for decades yet. Hopefully, until I die or can’t get down the basement stairs anymore. Or until someone comes up with a personal, laser plotter printer for fabric and I rip them out. Yeah, I’ll probably die first.

Now I’m left with the rest of the spandrel which is about 4 x 3 x 5′. That is a lot of valuable workshop space, although I have to leave access for the racks and for some electrical box stuff in the back. It won’t be an easy shelf build, but I will come up with some method of making good use of it. Currently, it holds about half my Lego collection and unused paint and plaster buckets, so it definitely has room for improvement, now that it has a purpose.

I think I’ll be spending a lot of time next year building in and refitting parts of my workshop. It has been a while since I made improvements to it and now that I’m refining some of my creative focus, it is time to get to it.

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